Dreaming : Journal of the Association for the Study of Dreams
Human Sciences Press, Inc., New York City

Volume 8, Number 3, September 1998 
 


CONTENTS

Dreaming as Psychosis: Re-reading Allan Hobson
Bert O. States
Page 137 

The Presentation of Dreaming and Dreams in Introductory Psychology Textbooks: A Critical Examination with Suggestions for Textbook Authors and Course Instructors
Leslie H. Squier and G. William Domhoff
Page 149

Predicting Outcome of Dream Interpretation Sessions by Dream Valence, Dream Arousal, Attitudes Toward Dreams, and Waking Life Stress
Jason S. Zack, and Clara E. Hill
 Page 169

Freudís Dream of the Botanical Monograph and Cocaine the Wonder Drug
John R. Cole
Page 187

BOOK REVIEW

The Multicultural Imagination: "Race," Color, and The Unconscious
Michael Vannoy Adams
Reviewed by Edward Bruce Bynum
Page 205


 

Bert O. States 
Dreaming as Psychosis: Re-reading Allan Hobson
Dreaming: Journal of the Association for the Study of Dreams. Vol 8(3) 137-148, Sep 1998.

Abstract:

This article is a response to Allan Hobsonís theory that dreaming is a form of psychosis and functional delirium. Without denying the resemblances between the two mind-states, or the validity of Hobsonís general argument that dreaming arises from a chemical "balancing act," I attempt to view this theory from a more functional point of view. Thus, I see the central "psychotic" characteristics of dreamingódisorientation, attention deficit, spotty recent memory, confabulation, deficit in intellectual functions, and decline of language usageóas aspects of the dreamís metaphorical/analogical function of memory consolidation and of the thought process at large. I explore waking variations of the same process.


Key Words: :
dreaming; psychosis; delirium; metaphor; analogical thinking.

 



 Leslie H. Squier and G. William Domhoff 
The Presentation of Dreaming and Dreams in Introductory Psychology Textbooks: A Critical Examination with Suggestions for Textbook Authors and Course Instructors
Dreaming: Journal of the Association for the Study of Dreams. Vol 8(3) 149-168, Sep 1998.

Abstract:

The treatment of dreaming and dreams in 42 introductory psychology textbooks is examined in terms of (1) the context within which the discussion appears; (2) the frequency with which various topics are addressed; and (3) the adequacy of the treatment given to each topic, with "adequacy" indexed by (a) the accuracy with which sources are used; (b) the range of the literature included; and (c) the degree to which critiques within the literature are acknowledged. It is concluded that most textbooks have inadequate presentations of dreaming and dreams because they either (1) equate REM sleep and dreaming; (2) are uncritical of the activation-synthesis and problem-solving theories of dreaming; (3) exaggerate the possibilities of "lucidity" and "control" in dreams; (4) do not give a full and accurate account of systematic work on dream content; or (5) ignore work showing that dreaming is a cognitive process that develops gradually during childhood. Suggestions are made to improve future discussions of dreaming by course instructors and textbook authors by (1) beginning with the developmental findings on dreaming; (2) stressing the continuities between waking and dreaming cognition; and (3) making more use of systematic findings on the age, gender, and cross-cultural correlates of dream content which suggest that dreams have psychological meaning.

Key Words: dreams; dreaming; cognition; REM sleep; textbooks.


  
Jason S. Zack and Clara E. Hill 
Predicting Outcome of Dream Interpretation Sessions by Dream Valence, Dream Arousal, Attitudes Toward Dreams, and Waking Life Stress
Dreaming: Journal of the Association for the Study of Dreams. Vol 8(3) 169-185, Sep 1998

Abstract:

Thirty-eight undergraduate psychology students served as volunteer clients in single dream interpretation sessions using Hillís cognitive-experiential model for working with dreams. Client-rated dream valence, dream arousal, waking life stress, and attitudes toward dreams were used as predictors of client-rated outcome of the session. Dream valence (client-rated pleasantness or unpleasantness of the dream) predicted session outcome, with moderately unpleasant dreams and extremely pleasant dreams yielding better outcomes than neutral, moderately pleasant, or extremely unpleasant dreams. Attitudes toward dreams were also related to session outcome, with moderate attitudes toward dream interpretation resulting in better outcomes than positive or negative attitudes. Dream arousal and client waking life stress were not related to session outcome. Limitations and implications for dream interpretation are discussed.

Key Words: dream interpretation; stress; dream valence; dream arousal; attitudes toward dreams.


John R. Cole 
Freudís Dream of the Botanical Monograph and Cocaine the Wonder Drug
Dreaming: Journal of the Association for the Study of Dreams. Vol 8(3) 187-204, Sep 1998.

Abstract:

Freud gave great prominence to his own Dream of the Botanical Monograph, which he interpreted as a bit of unconscious self-justification for his indulgent book purchases. However, his own published associations suggest much deeper shame and guilt, and historical inquiry can document an explanation. Freudís youthful enthusiasm for cocaine had led not just to his publication of a controversial botanical monograph, "On Coca" (1884), but also to his use of this wonder drug to treat his admired but wounded friend Fleischel. That treatment had been a disaster for Fleischel, who had developed a cocaine psychosis. At the time of Freudís dream (March 1898), he was also struggling with a much bigger project, writing The Interpretation of Dreams. He wondered whether he would ever finish this monograph and whether his new enthusiasm would have lasting value. In his Dream of the Botanical Monograph, he combined anxiety about this enterprise with his shame and guilt about Fleischel.

Key Words: Freud; dream interpretation; history.

 


 

Journal Index

List of Issues/Abstracts Instructions for Contributors
Contact the Editor Online Articles
Announcements Article Discussion Archive 
  Copyright ©2003 Association for the Study of Dreams. All Rights Reserved